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20130801
20130831
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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
the country's capacity for self inflicted damage must have astounded even osama bin laden and points out there is always a nightmare of acquiring use -- terrorists acquiring and using these weapons of mass destruction that nothing would give them greater satisfaction that we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict our lives and our liberties accordingly. guest: i think this is always a difficult debate. i think if we step back and look at it, since 9/11, the united states even though we are one of the most open and free countries , has remained, frankly, open and free. we continued to have super bowl's and people travel abroad and robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action, i would use the analogy of it is like a hurricane. forecasting weather a potential storm and we're battening down the hatches and a few limited places. if the storm passes, great, but this administration is leaning forward and a way i think is professionally responsible and they are being advised not just by political advisers but also the cia -- one of my old agenci
, the intelligence that sparked all this was a communication from osama bin ladin's replacement, ayman al zawahiri to the head of the al qaeda arm in yemen. the terrorist leaders discussed plotting an attack to coincide with a in muslim holy day this week. this afternoon nbc news is reporting that one reason the u.s. reacted so aggressively is because al qaeda operatives said they wanted an attack that, quote, would change the balance of power in the region. well, as american counter terrorist officials are dealing with this threat, some on the right are using it to hit the president as weak on national security. big surprise there. take a look what bill kristol and former senator jim demint said this weekend on fox. >> four years ago, president obama gave a much heralded speech, his outreach to the muslim world. now four years later we're closing embassies throughout the arab world. a year ago he said al qaeda is on the run. now we seem to be on the run. i'm not criticizing the decision to close the embassies. that's probably the right thing to do for the sake of trying to save american lives and
and others but it's a terrible thing that -- just a year ago, boasting al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. now an unprecedented closure of 22 embassies. >> i'm not questioning what he's doing. i think what bill is saying is true is our attempt to placate parts of the world reset to whether it's russia or somewhere else are clearly not working. the perception of weakness in this administration is encouraging this kind of behavior. >> of course, those were extreme hawks. someone needs to tell jim demint al qaeda doesn't care what you're relationship is with russia. for more on how washington reacted, i'm joined by senior correspondent michael crowley with me and "the washington post" opinion writer jonathan capehart. i guess what's interesting here, skrungt you start, it's the quick almost rabble-rousing political hysteria. instead of joining in which was the initial impulse of people like peter cink and lindsey graham was to join forces and say we've got a unique threat coming out of yemen. orders passed from pakistan. and deal with the issue at hand. instead they reverted im
time they did this, when romney called him an apiecer, obama came out and said tell that to osama bin laden and the 15 leaders of al qaeda i've taken off the field. the notion that this guy is somehow appeasing our enemies is so preposterous. >> do you think they have polled on this, the neocons, they figure after the embarrassment of iraq, they wanted to fight the war. george w. wanted to fight it, and the vice president wanted to fight it. they all wanted to fight it. okay. they decided that we have sort of forgotten that, and now they're coming back. bolton is back, kristol is back. when they say retaliation, their idea of retaliation after 9/11, steve, was going into iraq. retaluation. what does that mean? >> i have never gotten the impression that their world views were radically altered by what happened in the last decade, after the invasion of iraq. i don't think the world view was changed. i think they sense an opportunity within the republican party, the argument in the republican party over foreign policy. whenever they see an opportunity to connect their agenda to oppositio
of lebanon. meanwhile, osama bin laden was watching these events unfold and essentially learned the lesson that america was cowardly, that they couldn't take a punch in the nose and that emboldened him to later on launch the attacks that we know he launched. i keep coming back to that because to me it seems like we have to figure out what type of strikes, what targets to strike. but isn't the bottom line here that the president said we have this red line of chemical weapons and if you cross that there will be enormous consequences. if we fail to deliver those enormous consequences, we lose all of our credibility in the reason gone, we lose all of our ability to act as a deterrent. iran is watching this and learning perhaps the same lessons that osama bin laden learned in 1983. >> krystal, the fact is international law was violated. the president's statement of crossing the red line occurred six to eight months ago. syria's used chemical weapons some months ago. in fact, some reports indicate that he's used this some number of times, even 100 times on a much limited scale. the red line bein
on terror is over. osama bin laden was killed, and he was killed. but the bottom line is you can try to kill al qaeda or any other groups like this vertically but they are greg horizontally while we're sleeping, and they're -- let's connect the dots. they're growing on the ground, growing on the internet, on social media groups. they have a magazine, al qaeda has a magazine called "inspire" we learn about through the boston bombers, learning how to make homemade bombs. they're encouraging lone wolf attacks and the old-school group is still continuing to plan bombs and the new school or younger followers are now trying to recruit other followers -- >> neil: apparent live a lot of -- apparently a lot of them. one thing we discovered in the last few week wes had the prison breaks, hundreds of al qaeda types in and looks like locusts throughout the region and they're angry, they're jazzed, they want to do something. and -- what do you think? >> isn't it curious that some of bin laden's stated goals were to overthrow what he called the corrupt regimes in the region, expel the infidels from the ho
aggressive when you look on the policy of drones, going in and getting osama bin laden, something the bush administration failed to do. and he's alsoing more cautious. if you look at the way we dealt with libya and egypt, sort of backing off and sort of supporting what we saw as the goals of the arab street without putting boots on the ground, so this president who was famously cautious about iraq is now in an awkward position. the things we were told about saddam hussein are actually true in libya, and we have this caution. >> we are talking about the republicans in their her to the president, a lot of people were questioning where they were yesterday at the march on washington, the celebration. we have dr. martin luther king's speech yesterday, but i want to show -- i'm sorry. we don't have that sound, but what i do have is the information that john boehner and eric cantor were invited to be there, and they decided not to be there. mlk was a registered republican, wasn't he? >> according to one family member. >> his father was. >> his father was. >> why would republicans take a distant a
that jihadists have used to their advantage. yemen, the ancestral home of osama bin laden has become the base of al qaeda. eight years later the terrorist organization targeted the u.s. embassy in the yemeni capitol killing one american. in 2011 robert worth wrote an article in "the new york times." it was titled "yemen on the brink of hell." yemen is a source of leverage for weakened regimes. quote, terrorism helps raise the profile of a country that had long been neglected. as one yemeni official put it to me, yemen used to be called the tail of the saudi cow. now it is its own cow. former president alley abdullah saleh seemed to view al qaeda as a bargaining chip. he paroled convicted terrorists or allowed them to escape from prison, even as he cracked down on the peaceful protestors. i have two analysts joining me. in terms of being a partner, if you will, on the war on terror, can the yemeni redress it? as you pointed out, having al qaeda in their backyard has almost been a point of leverage with the west and we see what the sewing of those seas have brought in yemen today. >> that's tru
/11 generation, we are accomplishing what we set out to do. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. the core of al qaeda in afghanistan in pakistan is on the way to defeat. that happened because of you. because of you, more afghans are reclaiming their communities. their markets, their schools, their towns. and they have a chance to forge their own future. because of you, more afghans are trained and stepping up and defending their own country. because of you, and to preserve the gains you fought and bled for, we're going to make sure that afghanistan is never again a source of attacks against our country. that happened because of you. so the war in afghanistan is still going, for you, that means fewer deployments, more training time, preparing for the future, getting back to what marines do better than anybody else on earth, amphibious operations. it means more time here on the homefront with your families, your wives, your husbands, your kids. but of course, the end of the war in afghanistan doesn't mean the end of threats to our na
libya, and putting the special forces into pakistan to get to osama bin laden, those were cases where the president wanted to be careful and get to a specific end game. here, i think we're not looking for an open-ended military conflict. but the military strategy is probably on the president's desk. that the joint chiefs are probably looking at right now. i've been in some of the rooms where the military options have been discussed. the number one reason, to degrade his capabilities, to deter him from doing this again. we have lost some of it, it is to hold at risk something that assad values. so if we can put in our sight those things we values, the military command in control, the military headquarters, the rocket-firing capabilities, and some of his air offensive, that can be accomplished. >> can that be accomplished with military strikes? >> it can be accomplished, we just put on station a fifth guided missile destroyer, the uss stout came to the eastern area today. we'll have enough fire power, while we would love to have allies like the brits, we don't need them for fire power,
of building seven. now that osama bin laden is dead and 911 is a decade behind us and more, i think a good argument can be made that the documents that the federal government has regarding the 911 attacks should be declassified and the truth will come out. host: you have to distinguish between those two things. bradley manning did leave an awful lot of classified information. evidently, it went to wikileaks and i think the court was correct in deciding it was not guilty of aiding the enemy because he had not directed that information to the enemy and that is what the statute says. that is how military justice rules agreed. with regard to the rest of it, i think it is clear that he did, in fact, leaked confidential information that was classified and therefore, he got punished. many people do great things sometimes get punished for them. i think back to the civil-rights era and help congressman john lewis was punished over and over again for acts of courage. this countryrs because the security system, the intelligence community and the military defense complex, military-industrial complex h
the navy seal team six. that's the same unit that killed osama bin laden. >>> she wanted to see a rhino up close. so a woman at the denver zoo made an extra $60 for a special meet and greet. but the animal wasn't on board, not as friendly. he attacked her, biting her finger when she reached out to feed it. >> he's not in trouble. we do not believe this was an aggressive action. i think this was just a very terrible, unfortunate accident. >> gretchen: no word on her condition this morning. the denver zoo has suspended its rhino meet and greet program. i guess it's a good idea. >>> we showed you the video. a woman gets called on stage to sing a duet with kristen chenowith. little did kristen know the fan could really belt it out. ♪ ♪ >> oh, sing it, sing it! >> gretchen: we just found out that fan who happens to be a vocal coach was just invited back to the stage. the hollywood bowl asking her to perform again next month. you never know, eric. you've got to be in the right place at the right time. >> eric: you know why the rhino bit the lady's finger off? the zoo charged 60 bucks. the rh
imprudent in crossing the border, going after osama bin laden. i don't think he's burdened by the history bush. i think he's burdened by his sense of responsibility here. in terms of the analogy you draw, it's slightly different here. it's a different region. we have now the threat of al qaeda that bill clinton -- at least in that instance, wasn't dealing with. you don't want to be in a position where in some way you empower the wrong people which is why, brian, rushing in there was not necessarily the smartest thing to do in the past. but now you have a situation where these weapons have been used. the president did draw a red line. >> there's no ambiguous wmd that we don't -- >> and listen to the president -- >> -- in afghanistan that in the end means nothing -- we've seen children dying -- >> yes, without question. seems to me just listening to the president this morning that he was signaling that he recognizes that as well. i expect they will take action, whether it's the no-fly zone that general wolffe is recommending or surgical strikes, we'll see. >> i understand this, the images a
, is you have to knock out these people. president obama did it with osama bin laden who was not a leader of a nation, but a leader of the al qaeda movement. the united states did it with saddam hussein. one of the questions, and it is a difficult and collocated question, and i do not want to pretend this is a self-evident answer in terms of what to do, is if i thought is gone, what is an openm? that question. you have analysts on both side of the issue that argue on the key question, which is how strong are the relatively moderate rebel forces in syria? theypeople say because were not aided earlier, they are too weak now and there's not much hope that they could help others, like one of the strategys of the surge actually said that rebel forces that are relatively moderate are fairly strong and we could make a difference. david up next from north carolina. good morning. caller: actually, that is wilson, north carolina. i would like to thank you for being so moderate. your art to a great job interviewing him. it is still speculation that this has not used chemical weapons against his own
you believe that osama bin laden head for five years in pakistan without anybody in the military or intelligence knowing about it? >> that i'm going to ask you for ten words. they don't believe it? >> then is just my opinion. i don't think the general knew that. i don't think that the leadership -- i don't think there was a plan for where he was the this was 700 meters from the gates of west point. who knows what 700 meters, but the reality is a three distinct and compound -- it was like a funny house at the end of the street people didn't act the same as everybody else in the neighborhood in the area where people are not naturally trusting. so, somebody facility did something. malae sort of buying into the idea that the ambassador and i were talking it's not official but it can be someone that has relationships with officials was actually providing the health and there is a failure to ask questions that need to be asked and a due diligence. >> if you read president musharraf's book, he talks about [inaudible] and sestak then there were three houses that were al qaeda houses that
of osama bin laden come of the president's reelection campaign and you may know her from her great work with the politics team at usa today and the managing editor of the american journalism review. next to rachel is jen pendry and who is not on your program. originally we were going to have an al jazeera reporter here but she has gone over to the mainstream and is now working for cnn, making her ineligible for the panel. so jen kindly agreed to step in and we appreciate that. she is the white house reporter for the huffington post and covers leadership on capitol hill. she joined huffington post a couple of years ago and spent years covering the legislative and executive wrenches of government for "rollcall." probably a walk in the park for her because she started covering the texas state legislature. again, stepping in for camille, so thank you for that. next to jen is john stanton who also has "rollcall" roots rate he is the chair of buzz feed here in washington. then smith, the editor described him as a reporter's reporter with being in his veins. he's a third-generation news man an
. that is no longer the case. osama bin laden is no longer their plotting against the u.s. and our allies. it does not mean there is not a continuing threat posed by al not mean ithat does has not changed in its way of using force. there are other ways to work with the international community to reach objectives. the president took a trip to africa where he highlighted some of the strong relationships the united states has there. this is the work that the president vowed to do when he took office, which is to rebuild some of the relationships that were in tatters when this president entered the oval office. that strengthens the united states on the international scene. it is good for broader national security interests. but it is something that the president and members of his team have to work on something -- have to work on every day. >> more than 100,000 people have been killed. that is effectively like wiping out the entire city of south bend, indiana. how many more people need to die before the u.s. does employ some use of force beyond humanitarian aid? >> what the president does is he is eva
and where that person is. if osama bin laden had been calling someone in the united states on their cell phone, i promise you it wasn't a stockbroker. we better know because these people are still plotting against us, and not if but when they strike again, the american people are going to turn to us and ask us, what has the federal government been doing to prevent this? we better have a good answer. because we live in a very dangerous world, one, by the way, where our enemies aren't just other countries anymore. our enemies are rogue states and their well-armed militias and radical clerics. this kind of danger calls for a clear strategic vision on foreign policy and this president sadly does not have one, which brings me to my third and primary concern about ms. power's nomination and it is one that is related to the united nations itself. we need an advocate in new york who makes it their primary focus to ensure that the united nations is more accountable, that it is more effective and that it efrbs u.s. interests and -- serves u.s. interests and is not a multilateral ideal in which we
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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